KMET PARTNERS WITH MINISTRY OF HEALTH IN TRAINNING KISUMU, MIGORI AND SIAYA COUNTIES SERVICE PROVIDERS ON IMPLANON NXT INSERTION

KMET Closing the Gap in partnership with the Ministry of Health trained close to one hundred health care providers from KMET supported facilities with the right skills on insertion of Implanon NXT.
The two partners conducted three days workshop in each of the three counties beginning with Migori, Kisumu and closing it all with Siaya County.
With the introduction of the new hormonal contraceptive (NXT) in market, there a rose the  need for not only training but also updating the health care providers performing insertions and removals of Implanon on the revised changes in the World Health Organization Medical Eligibility Criteria for contraceptive implants.
The service providers were taken through the procedure of Implanon NXT insertion during the practical session in the nearby facilities .NXT should be inserted just under the skin at the inner side of the upper arm, immediately after insertion, the presence of the implant should be verified by palpation. In case the implant cannot be palpated then the service provider should know that something might have gone wrong during insertion procedure. 
The Implanon NXT package contains a user card intended to remind the client of removal date, it records the batch number of the implant. All service providers are requested to record the date of insertion, the arm of insertion and the intended day of removal on the user card, the same data should be recorded on the facility record book to help secure commodity so that at any given time a client should not go unattended to due to lack of implant in the facility.

“School dropout and Early pregnancy springing up Child Marriage.” ICRW Study.

Choosing whether when and who to marry is one of the most important personal decisions that one can make.

Yet, in many places around the world, girls and boys are forced into marriage before they’re ready, a practice known as “child marriage”.

On Friday, KMET in partnership with International Center for Research on Women (ICRW) released study results on child marriage.

We conducted intensive qualitative research in Kisumu County with the objective of exploring and documenting the contextual factors that both propagate and prevent child marriage and to understand the process by which adolescent girls get married.

The results were disseminated at KMET Conference hall.

According to the study report presented by Suzzane Petroni of ICRW, what emerged were two direct precursors to child marriage across the study communities; school dropout and pregnancy.

Each of these drivers stemmed from a much broader context experienced by girls living in both study locations.

Additionally, it’s also stated that there is an ongoing process of social change regarding the recognition of adolescence as a distinct life stage and the related tensions involved in the negotiation of the rights and expectations of adolescents at both the family and community level.

Furthermore the study also highlighted that the perspective of many parents and adults, adolescent girls’ attitudes and behavior were the primary reasons for school dropout and are key drivers steaming school dropout.

“Some parents and adult community members expressed feelings of helplessness and lack of control over girls’ schooling decisions. Some went as far as to suggest that girls dropped out of school precisely because they wanted to get married,” it stated.

Speaking at the forum, County CeC for Education, Youth, Culture and Social services, Mrs. Jennifer Okere said that it is a collective responsibility of mothers, fathers and the community as a whole should ensure early child marriage ends.

In line with teenage pregnancy, the study also found out that most adolescents have limited access to information about sexuality and to sexual and reproductive health and rights meant that many girls and community members did not understand their rights to determine whether, when and with whom to have sex, or their right to access information and services that could meet their sexual and reproductive health needs, including contraception.

A statistical analysis of the study report showed that only 23.2 percent of girls in Kenya complete secondary education and 20.3 percent of girls get their first birth before the age of 18.

Interestingly, 22.2 percent of girls get married before the age of 18.

While giving possible solutions to the findings, the report suggested that wider-reaching and more robust programmes and policies are required to address some of the well-established challenges faced by adolescent girls that can result in child marriage and other negative consequences across Kenya.

“With greater opportunities and support from parents and communities, girls won’t be driven by circumstances into marrying early.

Instead, they will be able to realise their full capabilities and increase not only their own well-being, but that of their communities and countries as well,” the report read in part.

The study was conducted in Manyatta and Osiri both in Kisumu County

Choosing whether when and who to marry is one of the most important personal decisions that one can make.

Yet, in many places around the world, girls and boys are forced into marriage before they’re ready, a practice known as “child marriage”.

On Friday, KMET in partnership with International Center for Research on Women (ICRW) released study results on child marriage.

We conducted intensive qualitative research in Kisumu County with the objective of exploring and documenting the contextual factors that both propagate and prevent child marriage and to understand the process by which adolescent girls get married.

The results were disseminated at KMET Conference hall.

According to the study report presented by Suzzane Petroni of ICRW, what emerged were two direct precursors to child marriage across the study communities; school dropout and pregnancy.

Each of these drivers stemmed from a much broader context experienced by girls living in both study locations.

Additionally, it’s also stated that there is an ongoing process of social change regarding the recognition of adolescence as a distinct life stage and the related tensions involved in the negotiation of the rights and expectations of adolescents at both the family and community level.

Furthermore the study also highlighted that the perspective of many parents and adults, adolescent girls’ attitudes and behavior were the primary reasons for school dropout and are key drivers steaming school dropout.

“Some parents and adult community members expressed feelings of helplessness and lack of control over girls’ schooling decisions. Some went as far as to suggest that girls dropped out of school precisely because they wanted to get married,” it stated.

Speaking at the forum, County CeC for Education, Youth, Culture and Social services, Mrs. Jennifer Okere said that it is a collective responsibility of mothers, fathers and the community as a whole should ensure early child marriage ends.

In line with teenage pregnancy, the study also found out that most adolescents have limited access to information about sexuality and to sexual and reproductive health and rights meant that many girls and community members did not understand their rights to determine whether, when and with whom to have sex, or their right to access information and services that could meet their sexual and reproductive health needs, including contraception.

A statistical analysis of the study report showed that only 23.2 percent of girls in Kenya complete secondary education and 20.3 percent of girls get their first birth before the age of 18.

Interestingly, 22.2 percent of girls get married before the age of 18.

While giving possible solutions to the findings, the report suggested that wider-reaching and more robust programmes and policies are required to address some of the well-established challenges faced by adolescent girls that can result in child marriage and other negative consequences across Kenya.

“With greater opportunities and support from parents and communities, girls won’t be driven by circumstances into marrying early.

Instead, they will be able to realise their full capabilities and increase not only their own well-being, but that of their communities and countries as well,” the report read in part.

The study was conducted in Manyatta and Osiri both in Kisumu County

KMET, CCK and IISAH launches the Clubfoot Care project

KMET in partnership with Clubfoot Care for Kenya (CCK), Impact for Investment to support Access to Health (IISAH) Foundation and the Ministry of Health has launched the first ever clubfoot care project in the region that is set to be implemented in the larger western part of Kenya.

The launch comes after completion of a 12 month pilot study that was carried out by KMET and IISAH on improving the quality of physical rehabilitation services in resource-limited settings in five facilities in Kisumu County.

The new component that is the Clubfoot Care project facilitates training and mentorship of healthcare personnel on clubfoot care and aids families to access support and counselling to address psychosocial stigma associated with the condition.

Speaking during the Fisio Rehab review meeting held by the partners a few hours before the official launch, Kmet Fisio Rehab project consultant Mr. Isaac Otieno applauded the initiative as the first of its kind in the country and more so for being timely as Kenyan’s are now more at risk for non-communicable diseases than ever.

The team that is composed of health professions, physiotherapists, community health strategy focal persons and orthopedic technicians are geared towards eradicating clubfoot disability incidence in western region part of Kenya.

According to Kmet CEO Monica Ogutu, Increasing community awareness on clubfoot and building the capacity of medical staffs on the ponseti method in addition to supporting health facilities are some of the best ways in ensuring effective management of clubfoot cases.

adolescents and young people need comprehensive sexuality education

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HIV/AIDS has been reported as a significant health threat among adolescents and young people in Kenya today. 

According to the adolescent, youth and HIV in Kenya 2016 fact sheet, which is based on the latest national available data, 20.4% of all People living with HIV are adolescents and young people, while 14% of all AIDS-related deaths are among the same age cohort.

Approximately 46% of all new HIV infections in Kenya are among adolescents and young people, with girls and young women contributing to two thirds of these statistics.

In response to this perturbing situation KMET Kenya has offered to facilitate and train all Ministry of Education Quality Assurance Officers from the four reported counties with the highest HIV adolescent prevalent; Homa bay, Siaya, Kisumu and Migori on comprehensive sexuality education with effective interventions targeting adolescent and young people going beyond the health sector- into schools, and linking with other social sectors.

A two days' workshop organized by kmet on 8-9,August at Victoria Comfort Inn in Kisumu brought together all the Ministry of Education Quality Assurance Officers from Kisumu with the aim of reviewing the status of adolescent sexual and reproductive health in Kenya and Kisumu as well as identifying the roles they play in promoting age- appropriate sexuality education.

According to Sam Owoko assistant executive director Kmet, the education sector has a critical role to play and tremendous opportunity to prepare learners for leading sexually healthy lives.

“The young people face significant challenges to their sexual and reproductive health and realizing their full potential therefore Sexuality education can reduce these Vulnerabilities by building knowledge and skill that enable young people to reduce sexual risk behaviors.” Said Mr. Owoko.

AIDS is now the leading cause of death among adolescents and young people in Africa as well as in Kenya this is associated with HIV Stigma which is reported the main barrier preventing young people from getting tested for HIV, and accessing lifesaving treatment in Kenya.

According to Jack Onyando the National Professional Officer -HIV&AIDS UNICEF, Strategic partnerships and community engagement- multi sectors and Combination of Behavioral, Biomedical and structural in interventions is just but one of the key strategies in reducing HIV prevalence among the adolescent and young people in addition to effective communication between parent, teachers and service providers.